Nelson Mountain Fire Tower at Salt Hill

January 21, 2017 – Town of Cortlandt, NY

Difficulty: moderate

Length: approximately 2.5 miles

Route type: up and back

Map: Google Earth or Google Maps

 

After publishing a post about Hudson Valley Fire Towers, I was contacted by a reader named Ben with information about a fire tower that lay in ruins alongside the Croton Reservoir. I was intrigued and knew that I had to check it out. Ben supplied me with enough information that I knew I could find my way to it. I wanted to do this hike the previous week, but some light snow fell and since we would be hiking on unblazed trails, I decided to wait until the snow melted. The weather for this Saturday morning hike was foggy in the morning, but sunny in the afternoon and in the mid to high 30’s, not bad for January.

The Nelson Mountain Fire Tower sits at the summit of Salt Hill and was  a 73′ Aermotor LS40 tower erected by the Conservation Department in 1950. This tower was placed in service in 1951, reporting 22 fires and 70 visitors. With the advent of aerial detection, this tower was closed at the end of the 1971 season. Some time following that date, the tower was cut down or pulled over by persons unknown and its twisted remains are still on the 540 ft. summit of Salt Hill. That was all the information I could gather about this fire tower along with an old black and white photograph courtesy of the Westchester County Historical Society.

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower at Salt Hill

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower at Salt Hill

I was also able to find a list of the keepers that were employed during its operation.

list of keepers

list of keepers

We parked alongside Croton Avenue and proceeded to the trailhead using the GPS coordinates that I was provided. Although we began there, upon our return I determined that a much easier way to the trail was alongside a stone wall which is visible from the road which leads right to the trail. Nevertheless, we bushwacked through the woods and up the hill looking for any sign of a trail. We came to a stone wall and walked through the collapsed section.

stone wall

stone wall

We continued pass the stone wall and veered left. Going straight would have been an extremely steep climb up the mountain so using common sense I figured any trail would have skirted around the shoulder of the hill. As we walked through the woods, we saw some red blazes on trees and I was pretty sure this was the trail we were looking for. I was told that the trail was unblazed, but as long as this red-blazed trail led us uphill, I knew we were going in the right direction.

red-blazed trail

red-blazed trail

Surprisingly this trail is well maintained, which was evident by the blowdowns being cleared from the trail. I noticed tire tracks on the trail so I guess that bikers use and maintain this trail.

red-blazed trail

red-blazed trail

The trail led up the mountain on switchbacks and steeply in some spots, but we kept huffing and puffing towards the summit. It was foggy, serene and quite scenic. We didn’t encounter another living soul during this hike. No wildlife was to be seen or even any birds chirping. It was eerily quiet and I loved it.

red-blazed trail

red-blazed trail

At one point the red blazes started to lead away from the summit and we stopped following them. The trail though unblazed was clearly discernible until we neared the summit. The trail petered out, but thanks to Ben I knew that would happen. We walked along the ridge hoping to catch a glimpse of what we were looking for. The dense fog made for poor visibility, but I noticed a rectangular shape through the woods. I thought it might be the ruins of a building, but as I neared it I realized that it was the top of the fire tower.

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

If a fire tower falls in the woods, does it make any noise?

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

Nelson Mountain Fire Tower

It was pretty cool to see something that was pretty well hidden in the woods and that I had no clue existed. I grew up fishing in the area and have driven by Salt Hill countless times, never knowing what sat atop the summit. Thanks Ben. We explored the area and found a large cinder block building nearby. I do not know the origins of this building, but I can guess that it was possibly used for storage.

cinder block building

cinder block building

cinder block building

cinder block building

There was a lot of evidence of human activity in the immediate area that we checked out. There were a lot of steel barrels strewn about the area.

steel barrels

steel barrels

There were ruins of other small buildings as well.

building ruins

building ruins

When we were done exploring, we retraced our steps back to the red-blazed trail and headed down the mountain. When we got to the spot where we originally found the red-blazed trail, we stayed on it. Croton Avenue was visible through the trees and it was an easier route as well. The red-blazed trail began to parallel Croton Avenue and began to lead away from where we wanted to go. At this point we left the trail and bushwacked towards the road. We came to a lower section of the stone wall that we encountered at the beginning of the hike and passed through it.

stone wall

stone wall

We made our way to Croton Avenue, turning left and walked along the road back to where we had parked. We then drove over to Turkey Mountain Nature Preserve for part 2 of our Saturday hike. I hope that you enjoyed today’s hike and don’t forget to follow my blog. As always any comments and/or suggestions are welcome and feel free to share my posts with your friends. Until next time folks, now get out there and take a hike!

Pros: Scenic area, historical features, fire tower, ruins, secluded and quiet.

Cons: Limited views

Take a hike!

Take a hike!

2 thoughts on “Nelson Mountain Fire Tower at Salt Hill

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