Croton Landing Park

May 21, 2020 – Croton-on-Hudson, NY

Difficulty: Easy

Length: Approximately 2 miles

Max elevation: 14 ft. – total elevation gain: approximately 13 ft.

Route type: Out and back

Maps: Westchester RiverWalk Map

Trailhead parking: 1 Senasqua Road, Croton-On-Hudson, NY 10520

 

Park Overview:

Croton Landing Park stretches over a mile along the Hudson River and is located north of Senasqua Park, beyond the Yacht Club. Its paved walkway is part of the 51-mile Westchester RiverWalk (33 miles are complete). The park has an athletic field, a restroom, and a 9/11 memorial. The paved pathway extends along the river with benches a footbridge and informational signage explaining about the river. This is a popular destination with the local community. Croton Landing Park is open to all New York State residents.

Croton Landing Park

Croton Landing Park

History:

Croton Landing Park was the site of a former asphalt batching plant and at various times in its past, the land had been the site of brick works and a location for depositing fill from construction done in NYC. This property is a 30-acre site bounded on the west by the Hudson River and on the east by the Metro North/Amtrak railroad.

The property was formerly owned by the Ottaviano family and was referred to as the Seprieo property. The letters in “Seprieo” represented the initials of the Ottaviano children.

Before Route 9 was created, several streets in the Village led to the Hudson River although the railroad tracks had to be crossed to get there. With the advent of Route 9, the property was almost impossible to reach or to utilize except by some determined fishermen. Over time, it became overgrown and strewn with trash both dumped there and washed up from the river.

In the late 1980’s a ten-story residential development named Mariner’s Cove was proposed for the property, but the problem of access to the site was not solved.

In 1995, the property was subdivided into two lots. Lot 1 is 16.6 acres (of which 9.7 acres are underwater) and Lot 2 is 13.4 acres (of which 6.0 acres are underwater). Lot 2 was conveyed to the Village of Croton-on-Hudson and Lot 1 was conveyed to the Beaverkill Conservancy, Inc., a nonprofit land acquisition affiliate of the Open Space Institute.

Croton Landing Park

Croton Landing Park

In 2002, the former Seprieo property is officially named Croton Landing based on historic maps showing that name for the area dating back to 1865.

Croton Landing

Croton Landing

In early 2003 the Open Space Institute transferred its title of the Beaverkill portion (the northern section) of Croton Landing to the Village. The nothern section is now unofficially named North Cove.

In 2006, Westchester County and Croton agree to combine their efforts and funds for Croton Landing improvements, including the County’s proposed Riverwalk trail addition in the northern portion of the park. The 2300-foot trail addition is part of the County’s 51.5-mile RiverWalk trail system along the Hudson River from NYC to Putnam County.

In 2008, thirteen years after the initial purchase of the property, Croton Landing Park officially opened.

The Stroll:

You don’t need a map or a compass for this place. Just head towards the river and follow the paved path (the route of the Westchester RiverWalk), stopping as often as you like to capture images with your trusty camera. Or sit on a bench and soak in the gorgeous Hudson River Valley.

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

When the path splits, follow the arrows to the right, and walk across a boardwalk that spans a wetland. There are three benches for one to sit and spot some birds, if you have the patience.

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

As you continue on the paved path, there are some more benches that look out on the Hudson and across to Rockland County.

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

The Westchester RiverWalk continues north along the wide park road.

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

Looking south towards Croton Point Park (left) and Hook Mountain (right).

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

If you look between Croton Point Park (left) and Hook Mountain (right) on a clear day, you can see the new Tappan Zee Bridge.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Looking out across Haverstraw Bay, with Hook Mountain State Park (the long ridge on the left) and High Tor State Park on the right.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

At the end of this section of the Westchester RiverWalk is “Reaching Through the Shadow,” a September 11 Memorial built around a 14-ft. steel beam from the World Trade Center. This section of the Westchester RiverWalk ends here. Evetually it will continue along the tracks to connect with Oscawana Island Nature Preserve.

September 11 Memorial - Croton Landing Park

September 11 Memorial – Croton Landing Park

Recovered steel from the twin towers has been used as a memorial in each of the fifty states.

September 11 Memorial - Croton Landing Park

September 11 Memorial – Croton Landing Park

“Reaching Through the Shadow,” a Buchanan – Cortlandt – Croton-On-Hudson 9/11 Remembrance Memorial was created by Lauren Davis from Croton. The bronze was cast using the lost-wax technique at Modern Art Foundry in Queens.

September 11 Memorial - Croton Landing Park

September 11 Memorial – Croton Landing Park

Across Haverstraw Bay, Rockland County’s Hudson River Palisades undulate on the horizon.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Looking north up the Hudson River.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Looking west towards Rockland County. Haverstraw Bay’s physical and biological characteristics make it one of the most significant estuarine areas in the Hudson River. The bay is deeper on its western side with a shipping channel of minimum 32 feet in depth and 300 feet in width. The bay’s eastern side is shallower with most of that section of bay not more than 10 feet deep. Look across the river and see if you can spot the “Sleeping Indian” there among the hills. His head is downstream (left), toes pointing the way to Albany.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

On the return walk, one can wander along the sandy beach.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Looking south towards the Tappan Zee Bridge.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

A Killdeer along the shore. Shallow depths with ample sunlight lead to robust aquatic vegetation. Inflows of brackish Atlantic Ocean water overlaid with fresh stream water promote a nutrient rich environment for myriad invertebrate, fish, and bird species.

Killdeer - Croton Landing Park

Killdeer – Croton Landing Park

A powerboat on the Hudson, with Croton Point Park just beyond.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

There are interrupted sections of beach along the way.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

You may want to take a break along the beach, perhaps on a well placed length of driftwood.

Hudson River - Croton Landing Park

Hudson River – Croton Landing Park

Or catch some shade in a driftwood hut on the beach.

driftwood hut - Croton Landing Park

driftwood hut – Croton Landing Park

The best seat in the house.

driftwood hut - Croton Landing Park

driftwood hut – Croton Landing Park

At the time that it was acquired, the park was not particularly “park like.” A former industrial site, the property was littered with trash and access was hampered by the presence of the Amtrak/Metro North railroad corridor in Croton-on-Hudson.

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

Croton Landing Park celebrates the rehabilitated Hudson River, on the east shore of Haverstraw Bay. The park is a good example of reclaiming the beauty of the Hudson River Valley, that was almost lost.

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

A different persepective as you retrace your steps back to the parking lot. If you wish to extend your walk, you can follow the Westchester RiverWalk to Senasqua Park and beyond.

Westchester RiverWalk - Croton Landing Park

Westchester RiverWalk – Croton Landing Park

Review:

Gorgeous Hudson River views, what more can you ask for? Been here numerous times and have enjoyed every one of my visits. The change of seasons gives the park different looks. Great for a leisurely stroll or just to have lunch, picture perfect every time. For extended walks, one can park by Senasqua Park and begin from there or walk south on the Westchester RiverWalk to Croton Point Park and beyond.

Pros:

Hudson River views, well maintained park, plenty of benches to sit on, ample parking.

Cons:

Does see a lot of foot traffic in nice weather.

 

Take a stroll!

Croton Landing Park

Croton Landing Park

Sources:

 

 

 

 

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